Pinterest/Interest

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Reverting to my childhood?

I have been reading young adult/children's literature lately: Charlotte's Web, Stuart Little, and now James and the Giant Peach. Why? I want to see what makes for classic children's literature, what children/young adults are reading. I've checked out from the library Deenie and tales of a fourth grade nothing by Judy Blume and a few more recently written YA books. Hopefully, I'll be able to read them. Who knows, maybe they'll tickle my inspiration.

Back in the 1970s I read a book Growing Young by Ashley Montigu. He cited studies that show how as we grow older we become more like children again. I was greatly impressed by the book and read it several times. Now, as I'm growing older, I see it happening in myself. I'm not unhappy about it; in fact, I think it's kind of neat. So, maybe this has something to do with my reading YA. When I was a child/adolescent I never read books. So, I missed all of these good children's books. Reading them now, and finding them somewhat interesting, is a pleasant surprise. And, yes, in the back of my mind I'm thinking "maybe I can do this, write children's books." I'm not sure it will ever happen, but it does offer me a semblance of hope.

15 comments:

Julie Luek said...

Oh I've had this urge to go back and reread two of my childhood favorites: Anne of Green Gables and The Secret Garden. Like comfort food for the imagination!

Optimistic Existentialist said...

I want to go back and read Mutiny on the Bounty! It was my favorite book as a youngster.

Misha Gericke said...

Great idea to read some YA books. They can be surprisingly inspiring.

I also read books I missed in childhood now. Although I've always read, I read so many adult books in between that I missed some really good stories aimed at children.

Julia Hones said...

Lovely idea Richard.
It must be wonderful to travel back to the land of childhood.

Tanya Lynne Reimer said...

What a wonderful story. I read a lot of kid stories to my brats. and before that to my siblings. I love how one cried over Charlotte's Web yet another was angry about it. The magic of children. Hope you discover your own web of emotions. :)

Emily R. King said...

Wonderful idea! I'm rereading A Wrinkle in Time. :)

Jon said...

I love to read literature that's written for children. Now that I'm WELL into adulthood, I more fully understand these books and realize that they aren't solely for the enjoyment of children.

Elizabeth Varadan, Author said...

One of the great things about deciding to write full time is that reading books can be considered "research." I love the time to read, and I think children's books are some of the best books around.

Deb Shucka said...

This makes me happy, reading your words about reading kids' books. Some of the best writing around is to be found in the pages of books written for kids. I'd recommend working your way through Newbery winners for a taste of the best of the best. And I hope you'll give the writing of a kids' book a try.

Denise Covey said...

Richard, I was so thrilled to see at my local bookshop recently a whole stand of classics made into children's books -- so colourful and appealing. I hope it introduces a whole new gen to the classics.

Lynda R Young said...

children's books have so much to offer

Elise Fallson said...

I'm getting back into reading children's books because of my daughter who is at that age and is starting to learn to read. It helps that she really loves books. I read her a contempoary middle grade book but wasn't to impressed. I'd like to hunt down some of the classics I read as a kid and see what she thinks of them today. I think if the muse strikes, you should write children's books. Plus, you could ask your grandchild to critique it. (:

nothing profound said...

St. Exupery's "The Little Prince" was always a great favorite of mine. Something worth reading over and over.

Vett Vandiver said...

it's great to go back and reread childhood classics!

Elizabeth Varadan, Author said...

I really love reading children's books, and I have returned to quite a few of my childhood favorites: Mary Poppins, The Cuckoo Clock, to mention a couple. And the Five Children trilogy by Edith Nesbit Bland. Lovely English humor!